This summer has had us scrambling at every possible dry opportunity to get on to a lengthening queue of rooftops to do thermal inspections for moisture. What Mother Nature is giving us is not what a happy thermographer likes to see! In order to get the best results from a roof inspection, we should have 2 days of sun, no rain, and temperatures above 15C. I think it has rained almost every other day in Toronto since the beginning of May!

One roof we had the opportunity to inspect this spring was a bit of conundrum. We knew there was damage to the roof in a storm which caused small tears in the membrane. Having a rigid insulation, it was not absorbing moisture into the insulation, but the signs were there that water was penetrating through the roof. We wanted to be able to give the customer a clear visual to prove this and utilized an indoor roof inspection method outlined in this article  to show the client that moisture was indeed penetrating the roof and settling onto the metal deck below.

Here are some of the images!

Indoor Roof InspectionInfrared imaging of moisture penetrating through insulation and vapour barrier, settling on metal roof deck.  metal roof deckInfrared imaging of moisture penetrating through insulation and vapour barrier, settling on metal roof deck.
 metal deck, drain hopperBelow Drain Hopper (less insulationto encourage drainage)  metal deck, no moistureNo moisture penetrating through theinsulation.